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    MINI boost for Tiny Forest initiative to promote biodiversity in urban areas

    MINI UK has partnered with Earthwatch Europe to support the Tiny Forest programme. This is to boost biodiversity in urban areas and creating accessible green space for communities to reconnect with nature.

    A Tiny Forest is made up of 600 densely packed native trees in a space the size of a tennis court. This is capable of attracting over 500 animal and plant species within the first three years. The first MINI-funded Tiny Forest has been planted in East Wichel Park, near the MINI Plant Swindon, in partnership with South Swindon Parish Council who manage the park.

    Location East Wichel Park, Swindon 1

    David George, director, MINI UK and Ireland, said: “MINI are really excited to partner with Earthwatch Europe to plant Tiny Forests in our local communities and across the UK. For over 61 years we have made cars using resources responsibly and to maximum effect. Our shared values of sustainability and bringing people together is what makes this such a great partnership.”

    With the help of young people from local schools and the wider community, over the next two years, Earthwatch will collect data from the MINI Tiny Forest. The data will look at carbon absorption, flood mitigation, thermal comfort and biodiversity, as well as assess the social and wellbeing benefits of having this new green space in an urban area.

    Location East Wichel Park, Swindon planting trees

    Louise Hartley, Tiny Forest programme manager at Earthwatch Europe, said “Tiny Forests provide rich opportunities for connecting young and old alike with the environment and sustainability. It’s vital that we give people the knowledge and skills to protect our natural world and inspire them to take positive action. We are delighted to be working with MINI UK to bring these inspiring spaces to Swindon and Oxford.”

    The next MINI Forest will be planted in Oxford in 2022, with plans for more across the UK already in the making.

    Ian Osborne
    Ian Osborne
    Editor-in-Chief at ElectricDrives

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